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Crosstex LIG - St Landry Facility

Parent Companies:
Crosstex LIG Liquids, LLC
Crosstes Energy Services L.P.
EPA Facility ID:
100000121888
Other ID:
LA0945571
Facility DUNS:
0
Parent Company #1 DUNS:
0
Parent Company #2 DUNS:
0

Location:

Address:
1168 LIG Road
St Landry, LA 71367
County:
EVANGELINE
Lat / Long:
30.842, -92.269 (Get map)
Method:
ZIP Code - Centroid
Description:
Center of Facility
Horizonal accuracy:
50 m
Horizontal reference datum:
North American Datum of 1983
Source map scale:

Owner/Operator:

Name:
Crosstex LIG Liquids, LLC
Phone:
(214) 953-9500
Address:
2501 Cedar Springs, Suite 600
Dallas, TX 75201
Foreign Address:

Person responsible for RMP implementation:

Name:
Carl Thunem
Title:
Director Environ. Health & Safety
Email:

Emergency contact:

Name:
Mike LeBlanc
Title:
Area Superintendent
Phone:
(225) 687-2171
24-hour phone:
(318) 445-4568
Ext or PIN:

Other contacts:

Facility (or company) email:
Facility phone:
Facility (or company) URL:

Safety:

Local Emergency Planning Committee:
Full-Time Equivalent Employees:
0
Covered by OSHA PSM:
Yes
EPCRA section 302:
No
CAA Title Air Operating Permit:
No
CAA Permit ID#:
OSHA Star/Merit Ranking
No
Last Safety Inspection Date:
May 26, 1999
Inspecting Agency:
State environmental agency
Using Predictive Filing:
No

Processes:

Liquids Extraction
RMP ID:
53516
CBI claimed:
No
Program Level:
3
NAICS:
Natural Gas Liquid Extraction (211112)
Chemical name
CAS#
Quantity (lbs.)
CBI
Propane
74-98-6
270,000
No
Flammable Mixture
00-11-11
250,000
No
Methane
74-82-8
10,000
No
Public OCA Chemical
0
No
Public OCA Chemical
0
No
Public OCA Chemical
0
No

RMP Preparer:

Name:
Address:

,
Foreign Address:

Phone:

Latest RMP Submission:

Date:
June 23, 2004
Type:
Resubmission
Reason:
5-year update (40 CFR 68.190(b)(1))
Registered:
No
RMP ID:
37123

Deregistration:

Date:
Effective Date:
Reason:
Source terminated operations
Other Reason:

2. Toxics: Worst-case

None

3. Toxics: Alternative release

None

4. Flammables: Worst-case

Some Risk Management Plan information is not provided in the available RMP data. You need to make an appointment at an EPA Reading Room In order to get access to details from the Off-Site Consequence Analysis (OCA) such as:

Instructions on how to make an EPA appointment can be found here.

Public OCA Chemical (in Liquids Extraction)
CBI claimed:
No
Model used:
EPA's RMP*Comp(TM)
Passive mitigation
considered:
  • None
not considered:
  • Blast walls

5. Flammables: Alternative release

Some Risk Management Plan information is not provided in the available RMP data. You need to make an appointment at an EPA Reading Room In order to get access to details from the Off-Site Consequence Analysis (OCA) such as:

Instructions on how to make an EPA appointment can be found here.

Public OCA Chemical (in Liquids Extraction)
CBI claimed:
No
Model used:
EPA's RMP*Comp(TM)
Passive mitigation
considered:
  • None
not considered:
  • Dikes
  • Fire wall
  • Blast walls
  • Enclosures
Active mitigation
considered:
  • None
not considered:
  • Sprinkler systems
  • Deluge systems
  • Water curtain
  • Excess flow valve

6. Five-year accident history

No Registered Accidents

7. Prevention: Program level 3

Liquids Extraction, Natural Gas Liquid Extraction (211112)
Prevention Program ID:
30830
Safety Review Date
March 23, 1999, since latest RMP submission
PHA Update Date
May 7, 1998, since latest RMP submission
PHA Techniques
  • What if
  • HAZOP
Hazards Identified
  • Fire
  • Explosion
  • Overpressurization
  • Overfilling
Process Controls
  • Vents
  • Relief Valves
  • Check Valves
  • Scrubbers
  • Flares
  • Manual Shutoffs
  • Automatic Shutoffs
  • Interlocks
  • Alarms
  • Backup Pump
  • Grounding Equipment
  • Excess Flow Device
Mitigation Systems
  • None
Monitoring Systems
  • None
Changes since PHA
  • None Recommended
Training Type
  • Classrom
  • On the Job
Competency Testing
  • Written Test
Procedure Review Date
Jan. 27, 1997, since latest RMP submission
Training Review Date
April 1, 1995, since latest RMP submission
Maintenance Review Date
March 15, 1999, since latest RMP submission
Maintenance Inspection Date
Oct. 23, 1998, since latest RMP submission
Equipment Tested
Yes
Management of Change Most Recent Date
May 10, 1999
Management of Change Review Date
April 1, 1995
Pre-startup Review Date
March 31, 1999
Compliance Audit Date
None
Compliance Audit Change Completion Date
None
Incident Investigation Date
None
Incident Invest. Change Completion Date
None
Participation Plan Review Date
April 1, 1995
Hot Work Review Date
July 25, 2002
Contractor Safety Review Date
July 28, 2002, since latest RMP submission
Contractor Safety Eval. Date
May 3, 1999, since latest RMP submission

8. Prevention Program level 2

No Prevention Program level 2

9. Emergency response

Facility In Community Plan:
No
Facility Own Response Plan:
No
Specific Facility Response Plan:
Yes
Inform. Procedures in Response Plan:
No
Emergency Care in Response Plan:
Yes
Plan Review Date:
Response Training Date:
June 17, 1999
Local Response Agency:
Local Response Agency Phone:
(318) 363-3267
Subject To - OSHA EAP:
No
Subject To - OSHA HAZWOPER:
No
Subject To - CWA:
No
Subject To - RCRA:
No
Subject To - OPA:
No
Subject To - State EPCRA:
No
Subject To - Other:

Executive Summary

Executive Summary

The accidental release prevention and emergency response policies at our facility:

In this gas processing plant, we handle natural gas, propane, butane, and natural gasoline. Because the Company recognizes that these substances are flammable and potentially dangerous, we assign the highest priority to protecting the safety and health of our employees, the community and the environment. Our policies follow the recommendations of the applicable industry recognized Codes and Standards, as well as the regulations of the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality and the US Environmental Protection Agency. It is our policy to adhere to all applicable Federal and state rules and regulations. Safety depends on the manner in which we handle our products, combined with the safety devices inherent in the design of the facility and the training of our personnel.

Our Process Safety Management Program emphasizes that safety and protection of the environment supercede production goals. The plant is designed with safety features that protect the plant from operational upsets and allow it to be safely shut down if necessary.

We have conducted operability studies to insure the safety of the process and manage changes in the process as they become necessary. Monthly safety meetings are held with our employees as well as prior to both planned and unplanned maintenance activities. We also have written procedures for maintenance that insures the isolation of potentially dangerous sources of energy.

Our facility and the regulated substances we handle:

The primary purpose of this facility is to separate liquefiable hydrocarbons (propane, butane, and natural gasoline) from natural gas (methane). Our feedstock (natural gas) enters and leaves the plant via pipeline. The plant separates the products from the gas stream, which are stored in pressurized tanks until customers travel to the plant and transport them via tank truck.

This plant recovers these pro
ducts using a process known as refrigerated lean-oil absorption. This is actually two processes combined in order to improve efficiency. Gas flowing into the plant is chilled using a propane-based refrigeration system, and then counter-currently contacted with the lean oil stream. The ?lean oil? is a light hydrocarbon (a liquid at ambient conditions) that has an affinity for the products, particularly at low temperature. After the natural gas contacts this oil it leaves the plant via pipeline.

The ?lean oil? is now termed ?rich oil? because it now contains our products. They are separated from the oil by heating it ? the lighter hydrocarbons are ?boiled off? and captured under pressure, the oil is then once again ?lean? and the process is repeated. The mixture of our products is then directed to our fractionator, which separates the mix (or ?fractions?) into our final products ? propane, commercial butane, and natural gasoline. The fractionator takes advantage of the different boiling points of our products, and uses a series of tall towers that sequentially separate the products. The maximum quantity of each product that can be stored at this plant is: propane, 800,000 lbs.; butane, 920,000 lbs.; and natural gasoline, 550,000 lbs.

The worst-case release scenario and the alternative release scenario:

The ?worst case scenario? accident has been established as the rupture of our largest propane storage tank. The tank has a maximum capacity of 300,000 lbs., but is limited by written operating procedures to 90% full, or 270,000 lbs. It is assumed that this entire quantity is released as vapor, that it contacts an ignition source, and that 10% of the released quantity participates in the resulting explosion. Under this scenario, the distance to the endpoint of a 1.0-psi pressure wave is calculated to be 0.50 miles. There are public receptors within this distance from the tank. These assumptions and calculations were made using EPA guidelines and the EPA?s
computer program RMP*Comp which was designed for use in preparing the Risk Management Plan.

The ?alternative scenario? accident, one that is less severe than the ?worst case scenario? but more likely to happen would be a rupture of a loading hose during the loading of a propane tank truck. These hoses are equipped with ?excess flow valves? that shut off the flow of product in the event that the hose ruptures. This will limit the quantity of the release to 34 lbs. of propane. The contents of the hose would vaporize. For this scenario, it is assumed that the vapors ignite. The estimated distance to the lower flammability limit is less than 0.10 mile. This release has the possibility of extending beyond the facility boundary. These calculations were done following the same guidelines described above.

Our general accidental release prevention program and chemical-specific prevention steps:

Our facility is subject to the provisions of OSHA Regulations (Standards ? 29 CFR) Standard Number 1910.119, ?Process safety management of highly hazardous chemicals?. Under this Standard, we have invested significant effort in developing, implementing and continually reviewing several programs designed to insure a safe working environment and minimal risk of a release. These programs include a written plan to include employee participation, compilation of written process safety information including information pertaining to the highly hazardous chemicals present, and written operating procedures for normal, temporary and emergency conditions. We also maintain current piping and instrument diagrams and maintain the integrity of the relief system. We have conducted a process hazards analysis that we review a minimum of every five years and have in place a Management of Change Program and a documented employee training program. We also maintain a Mechanical Integrity Program that tracks the condition of our equipment.

Procedures are in place for incident investigations
. We have also developed an emergency response plan that has been coordinated with the Local Emergency Planning Commission.

Our five-year accident history:

We have had no accidents or accidental release of hazardous chemicals within the last five years.

Our emergency response program:

We have written a specific Emergency Action Plan for this facility. This plan is reviewed with our employees on a regular basis. We hold monthly safety meetings that cover current topics as well as regular review of the fire extinguisher and respirator use. Safety meetings are also held prior to both planned and unplanned maintenance events. Our plan has been reviewed with the LEPC and the local volunteer fire department.

Planned changes to improve safety:

We continually monitor our industry for information on how to conduct our business more safely. This includes changes in risk management philosophy as well as improved equipment designs and controls. Continual training of our employees also leads to improved safety.